Posted by: douwefrancis | July 13, 2009

I Am a Filipino (by Carlos P. Romulo)

… visions …

Today, let me share with you this profound essay written by Carlos P . Romulo.

Whatever spiritual creed you profess (if you do profess one), whatever your native dialect is, wherever you are right now, and whether you are pure-blooded or mestizo/mestiza… as long as your heart remains with the noble race of the Far East, you remain to be a child of the sun… a people set apart by its glorious past, its colorful present and its uncertain future…

Despite and in spite of everything, I hope that you will always remain to be proud of being a Filipino! And being proud does not end with the feeling of pride, but should translate into action – into a constant and conscious effort to uplift the lives of our dear countrymen and to work together towards creating a better future, a feat that we owe to future generations.

This is quite a long read but I do hope you will like it.

I AM A FILIPINO

by Carlos P. Romulo, former Secretary-General of the United Nations

I am a Filipino – inheritor of a glorious past, hostage to the uncertain future. As such I must prove equal to a two-fold task- the task of meeting my responsibility to the past, and the task of performing my obligation to the future. I sprung from a hardy race – child of many generations removed of ancient Malayan pioneers. Across the centuries, the memory comes rushing back to me: of brown-skinned men putting out to sea in ships that were as frail as their hearts were stout. Over the sea I see them come, borne upon the billowing wave and the whistling wind, carried upon the mighty swell of hope- hope in the free abundance of new land that was to be their home and their children’s forever.

This is the land they sought and found. Every inch of shore that their eyes first set upon, every hill and mountain that beckoned to them with a green and purple invitation, every mile of rolling plain that their view encompassed, every river and lake that promise a plentiful living and the fruitfulness of commerce, is a hallowed spot to me.

By the strength of their hearts and hands, by every right of law, human and divine, this land and all the appurtenances thereof – the black and fertile soil, the seas and lakes and rivers teeming with fish, the forests with their inexhaustible wealth in wild life and timber, the mountains with their bowels swollen with minerals – the whole of this rich and happy land has been, for centuries without number, the land of my fathers. This land I received in trust from them and in trust will pass it to my children, and so on until the world is no more.

I am a Filipino. In my blood runs the immortal seed of heroes – seed that flowered down the centuries in deeds of courage and defiance. In my veins yet pulses the same hot blood that sent Lapulapu to battle against the alien foe that drove Diego Silang and Dagohoy into rebellion against the foreign oppressor.

That seed is immortal. It is the self-same seed that flowered in the heart of Jose Rizal that morning in Bagumbayan when a volley of shots put an end to all that was mortal of him and made his spirit deathless forever; the same that flowered in the hearts of Bonifacio in Balintawak, of Gergorio del Pilar at Tirad Pass, of Antonio Luna at Calumpit; that bloomed in flowers of frustration in the sad heart of Emilio Aguinaldo at Palanan, and yet burst fourth royally again in the proud heart of Manuel L. Quezon when he stood at last on the threshold of ancient Malacañang Palace, in the symbolic act of possession and racial vindication.

The seed I bear within me is an immortal seed. It is the mark of my manhood, the symbol of dignity as a human being. Like the seeds that were once buried in the tomb of Tutankhamen many thousand years ago, it shall grow and flower and bear fruit again. It is the insigne of my race, and my generation is but a stage in the unending search of my people for freedom and happiness.

I am a Filipino, child of the marriage of the East and the West. The East, with its languor and mysticism, its passivity and endurance, was my mother, and my sire was the West that came thundering across the seas with the Cross and Sword and the Machine. I am of the East, an eager participant in its struggles for liberation from the imperialist yoke. But I also know that the East must awake from its centuried sleep, shape of the lethargy that has bound his limbs, and start moving where destiny awaits.

For, I, too, am of the West, and the vigorous peoples of the West have destroyed forever the peace and quiet that once were ours. I can no longer live, being apart from those whose world now trembles to the roar of bomb and cannon shot. For no man and no nation is an island, but a part of the main, there is no longer any East and West – only individuals and nations making those momentous choices that are hinges upon which history resolves.

At the vanguard of progress in this part of the world I stand – a forlorn figure in the eyes of some, but not one defeated and lost. For through the thick, interlacing branches of habit and custom above me I have seen the light of the sun, and I know that it is good. I have seen the light of justice and equality and freedom and my heart has been lifted by the vision of democracy, and I shall not rest until my land and my people shall have been blessed by these, beyond the power of any man or nation to subvert or destroy.

I am a Filipino, and this is my inheritance. What pledge shall I give that I may prove worthy of my inheritance? I shall give the pledge that has come ringing down the corridors of the centuries, and it shall be compounded of the joyous cries of my Malayan forebears when they first saw the contours of this land loom before their eyes, of the battle cries that have resounded in every field of combat from Mactan to Tirad pass, of the voices of my people when they sing:

Land of the Morning,Child of the sun returning…Ne’er shall invaders, trample thy sacred shore. 

Out of the lush green of these seven thousand isles, out of the heartstrings of sixteen million* people all vibrating to one song, I shall weave the mighty fabric of my pledge. Out of the songs of the farmers at sunrise when they go to labor in the fields; out of the sweat of the hard-bitten pioneers in Mal-ig and Koronadal; out of the silent endurance of stevedores at the piers and the ominous grumbling of peasants in Pampanga; out of the first cries of babies newly born and the lullabies that mothers sing; out of the crashing of gears and the whine of turbines in the factories; out of the crunch of ploughs upturning the earth; out of the limitless patience of teachers in the classrooms and doctors in the clinics; out of the tramp of soldiers marching, I shall make the pattern of my pledge:

“I am a Filipino born of freedom and I shall not rest until freedom shall have been added unto my inheritance – for myself and my children’s children – forever.

 

*Just a footnote: The National Statistics Office (NSO) has projected the Philippine population to be at 92.23 million by 2009. As of the August 2007 census, we are at 88.57 million.

About these ads

Responses

  1. If CPR is still alive today, do you think he will say this? And will you?
    Kabayan mo ko. Nagtatanong lang.

  2. Douwe, this is a very nice essay. This was used to be my oratorical piece when I was in Grade 2. My father used to teach me how to deliver this speech. Luckily I won. hehe
    This is also my favorite of all coz the capital of our province is mentioned here. lol

    anyway, just a comment. I think there are some word missing in the fourth paragraph. As far as I can recall, i think it goes this way…
    In my veins yet pulses the same hot blood that sent Lapulapu to battle against the first invader oif this land (alien foe) that drove Diego Silang and Dagohoy into rebellion against the foreign oppressor.

    Pero I think naa man siguro lain na version… or sayop lang ko. Kalimot na siguro ko. hehehe

  3. […] like you're just going to read it, yes? For particular pieces, I recommend Nick Joaquin's pieces. I Am A Filipino by Carlos P. Romulo is also a favorite. I only managed to find an English version, though, and it […]

  4. ……………………….wow………

  5. Pero I think naa man siguro lain na version… or sayop lang ko. Kalimot na siguro ko. hehehe……………………………..ganda po over

  6. ehehehe

  7. Thank God for being a Filipino.

  8. I am a Filipino unique with the strong and urging desire to live with dignity wherever in the world. No other people of other nation could look down summing me up with ridiculous eyes and a sarcastic dog smile upon me.

  9. I am a Filipino unique with the strong and urging desire to live with dignity wherever in the world. No other people of other nation could look down summing me up with ridiculous eyes and a sarcastic dog smile.

  10. love this essay so much

  11. I am a Filipino unique with the strong and urging desire to live with dignity wherever in the world. No other people of other nation could look down summing me up with ridiculous eyes and a sarcastic dog smile upon me.

  12. ithink this essay want us to be proud being filipino like our hero

  13. I THINK THIS ESSAY WANT US TOM BE PROUD TO OURSELVES LIKE OUR FILIPINO HERO

  14. ITS JUST THE WAY I LIKE IT!!!

  15. it is the best essay i read…
    hehehe i love it so much

  16. I proud to be a “filipino”
    -_-

  17. i’m proud this because i born filipino citizenship


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: